Aug.31

Sub Version control (GIT in windows) – git simple guide

This is just a simple guide for getting started with git. no deep knowledge 😉

 

setup

Download git set up file

 

 

create a new repository

 

 

 

Cloning an Existing Repository – (Similar to Checkout SVN)

If you want to get a copy of an existing Git repository – for example, a project you’d like to contribute to – the command you need is git clone. If you’re familiar with other VCS systems such as Subversion, you’ll notice that the command is “clone” and not “checkout”. This is an important distinction – instead of getting just a working copy, Git receives a full copy of nearly all data that the server has. Every version of every file for the history of the project is pulled down by default when you run git clone. In fact, if your server disk gets corrupted, you can often use nearly any of the clones on any client to set the server back to the state it was in when it was cloned (you may lose some server-side hooks and such, but all the versioned data would be there – see Git on the Server for more details).

You clone a repository with git clone <url>. For example, if you want to clone the Git linkable library called libgit2, you can do so like this:

$ git clone https://github.com/libgit2/libgit2

That creates a directory named libgit2, initializes a .git directory inside it, pulls down all the data for that repository, and checks out a working copy of the latest version. If you go into the new libgit2 directory that was just created, you’ll see the project files in there, ready to be worked on or used.

If you want to clone the repository into a directory named something other than libgit2, you can specify that as the next command-line option:

$ git clone https://github.com/libgit2/libgit2 mylibgit

 

Git Basics – Getting a Git Repository

https://git-scm.com/book/en/v2/Git-Basics-Getting-a-Git-Repository

 

 

https://git-for-windows.github.io/

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